PART 2:INFORMATION FILE

by Marina

- HOW THINGS WORK

 

Russell Cobb

 

Russell Cobb is a leading artist Illustrator based in the UK. Russell has received many industry awards including D&AD Silver and 5 Association of Illustrators Best of British Gold awards. In 2003 the Independent UK national newspaper voted him one of Britain's top ten Illustrators.
Russell was awarded Best in Book in Creative Review's Illustration Annual, 2011.

Russell's work has been featured in many international publications, amongst others 3X3 magazine New York, Tecknaren Stockholm and Illusive, Contemporary Illustration Berlin. Russell has collaborated with many leading art directors in advertising, design, publishing, editorial and interactive media.

The aspects of Russell's work that attracted me the most, is his ways of presenting both imagery and typography in his illustrations: I think that the images he produces are already so strong, considering colour choice and composition, that the writing is left out on the background. 

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Edward Tufte

 

Edward Tufte is a statistician and artist, and Professor Emeritus of Political Science, Statistics, and Computer Science at Yale University. He wrote, designed, and self-published 4 classic books on data visualization. The New York Times described ET as the "Leonardo da Vinci of data," and Business Week as the "Galileo of graphics." 

 

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The History of Rock 'n' Roll, 1955-74,from Edward Tufte's "Beautiful Evidence"

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Edward Tufte's work captured my eye because of his unique style and choices of presentation. His way of showing the statistics in a very clear yet artistic way, and the fact that those two factors go together very successfully in his work. I wanted to take up his skill of combining imagery and text really well together, by paying attention to the layout, typeface, colour, photography, images, information, etc. 

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Edward Tufte's work captured my eye because of his unique style and choices of presentation. His way of showing the statistics in a very clear yet artistic way, and the fact that those two factors go together very successfully in his work. I wanted to take up his skill of combining imagery and text really well together, by paying attention to the layout, typeface, colour, photography, images, information, etc. 

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Carsten Nicolai 

 

In his work carsten nicolai, born 1965 in karl-marx-stadt, seeks to overcome a separation of art forms and genres for an integrated artistic approach. Influenced by scientific reference systems, nicolai often engages mathematic patterns such as grids and codes, as well as error, random and self-organising structures.

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After his participation in important international exhibitions like "documenta x" and the "49th and 50th venice biennial", nicolai's works were shown in two comprehensive solo exhibitions at schirn kunsthalle frankfurt, germany (anti reflex), at neue nationalgalerie in berlin, germany (syn chron) in 2005, at haus konstruktiv, zurich (static fades) in 2007 and at cac, vilnius (pionier) in 2011. He is represented by galerie eigen + art in leipzig/berlin, the pace gallery and galleria lorcan o'neill in rome.

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Under the pseudonym noto carsten nicolai experiments with sound to create his own code of signs, acoustic and visual symbols. as alva noto he leads those experiments into the field of electronic music. Besides performing in club and concert halls, nicolai presented his audio-visual pieces at museums like solomon r. guggenheim museum in new york, san francisco museum of modern art, centre pompidou in paris, kunsthaus graz or tate modern in london. Additionally he pursues projects with diverse artists such as ryuichi sakamoto, ryoji ikeda (cyclo.), Blixa bargeld (anbb), michael nyman, mika vainio or thomas knak (opto). His latest musical project with olaf bender (byetone) is called diamond version and is released on mute records.

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Ursus Werhli

 

The Art of Clean Up: Life Made Neat and Tidy.

From bringing new meaning toordering the cosmos to arranging alphabet soup in alphabetical order, his obsessive deconstruction and reorganization of life’s necessary small chaoses is at once utterly delightful and playfully philosophical, reminding us of the quintessential human tendency to seek to bring order to the chaos of life.

I really like the way that Werhli arranges objects -his works look extremely accurate and organised, these are some factors I would love to achieve in my work.  

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- MADE TO PERSUADE

Mike Kelley

 

 

Mike Kelley was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1954. He studied at the California Institute of the Arts and the University of Michigan. Major solo exhibitions include "Catholic Tastes," Whitney Museum of American Art, New York and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1993); "Mike Kelley," Museu d'art Contemporani, Barcelona (1997); "Framed and Framed, Test Room, Sublevel," MAGASIN, Grenoble (1999); "The Uncanny," Tate Liverpool and Museum Moderne Kunst Stiftung Ludwig, Vienna (2004); "Profondeurs Vertes," Musée du Louvre (2006); and "Educational Complex Onwards: 1995-2008," WIELS Centre d'Art Contemporain (2008). He died in Los Angeles in 2012.

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Catholic Birdhouse, 1978

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"At the time, people would generally talk about the birdhouses as formal jokes. People wouldn’t consider sublimation as an aspect of art production except in some heady, Freudian way, like, “Oh, these bad impulses are being nicely put into this object.” Instead of saying maybe it’s not so nice that these impulses are put into these objects. Maybe it’s pitiful that all these energies are pumped into a birdhouse. That’s what I realized I was going for, not some one-line joke like, “Here’s a birdhouse that’s minimalism.” Rather, here’s a structure that’s loaded with pathos, and you still don’t like it, you don’t feel sorry for it, you want to kick it. That’s what I wanted out of the thing—an artwork that you couldn’t raise, there was no way that you could make it better than it was. Its function as art actually makes it more uncomfortable."

Kelley challenged the characteristics of Conceptual art by using the debased, seemingly blank, birdhouse subject matter, followed by an ironic DIY handcrafted construction with idiosyncratic titles. Each of the houses are minimally constructed, no ornamentation, varying in entryway, playing with architectural form, sometimes turned upside-down or with multiple, repetitive roofs. In Catholic Birdhouse, Kelley depicts a horizontal white rectangle with a simplified short dark roof with two front entryway holes. Slightly below the roofs pitch is a very small hole with agitated, chipped marks, with the title above, in caps, THE HARD ROAD. Below the hole is a small cylindrical peg for a perch. Two inches below this hole appears a much larger, standard entryway, clean and without chipped marks. An inch below the hole in a larger cylindrical pegged perch, beneath lays the title, in caps, THE EASY ROAD. Kelley’s use of text plays with common biblical binary parables. His attached handwritten notations for each house continue to toy with Conceptual art practices through playful, far-fetched scenarios that defy the objects utility.

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-supports/

surfaces

 

Like many great art narratives, the tale of Supports/Surfaces has an air of improbability about it. After the euphoria of May 1968 implanted the notion in a generation of French youth that all was possible, that it was their task to dismantle every received structure, what were artists to do? Only a fool, or a Stalinist, of which there were many in the French Communist Party, would remain content with simple-minded protest art. In the era of Barthes, Derrida, Althusser and Lacan, after becoming enthralled by Mao's Cultural Revolution, how could you be satisfied with anything less than the thorough deconstruction of your medium and the ideologies underlying it? And so, with the demolitions of Of Grammatologyechoing in their minds, the promises of the barricades and visionary graffiti nagging in the background, a rising wave of radical French artists embraced . . . painting!

Painting? That most Establishment of mediums, which many people at the time thought thoroughly compromised and artistically exhausted? To grasp the perversity of Supports/Surfaces's placing painting at the center of its practice, take a look at comparable movements in other countries, such as Arte Povera in Italy or Post-Minimalism in the U.S.—for nearly all the artists associated with these tendencies the whole point was to escape painting by every possible means.

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-found

 objects/

objet

trouvé

 

Artists associated with Dada, notably Hans Arp and Kurt Schwitters, used damaged and reclaimed materials as a potent image of the futility of World War I. Schwitters, in particular, sought to redeem the beauty and history of everyday items selected with recourse to chance but carefully arranged according to strict principles of composition, as in Construction for Noble Ladies (1919; Los Angeles, CA, Co. Mus. A.). His formal approach related to contemporary Constructivist art, with which he was familiar, and led to the monumental structure of recovered material, the Merzbau (1923–36; destr.; reconstruction, 1980–83; Hannover, Sprengel Mus.), which he built inside his house in Hannover. Had its progress not been curtailed by the coming to power of the Nazis, this complex work would have been the apotheosis of the objet trouvé. While directly influenced by the Dadaists, and especially by the ready-mades of Marcel Duchamp and the objects of Man Ray, the use of the objet trouvé in Surrealism during the 1930s was prompted largely by a desire to create irrational juxtapositions. The interest shown by Salvador Dalí and André Breton in the nightmarish sculptures produced by Alberto Giacometti between 1930 and 1934 was an important factor in the impetus given to the Surrealist object. In 1936 the Galerie Charles Raton in Paris hosted an exhibition, Exposition surréaliste d’objets, devoted to found and made objects; the exhibits included natural objects and ready-mades as well as Oceanic sculptures, which were thought to draw on similar irrational sources. There Meret Oppenheim exhibited a fur-covered cup, saucer and spoon entitled Object (1936; New York, MOMA), a simple but disturbing transformation by which an inanimate object was given an implicitly sexual and animalistic identity. Also in 1936, at the Fantastic Art, Dada, Surrealism exhibition at MOMA in New York, Joseph Cornell’s mysterious and highly personal box constructions, which consisted largely of objets trouvés, were first presented in the context of Surrealism.

 

 

The idea of creating an entire environment out of objets trouvés, as pioneered in Dada and Surrealism, was also explored by amateur builders sometimes grouped together under the term art brut: notable examples include the Palais Idéal in Drôme, France, by the Facteur Cheval (1836–1924), and Simon Rodia’s Watts Towers in Los Angeles. Many of the smaller examples of art brut collected by Jean Dubuffet, who coined the term, consisted of large quantities of found objects, as did many of his own works. Similar methods were employed in the late 1950s in the Accumulations of Arman and in pictures by Enrico Baj employing fabric or wood veneer. The resurgence of interest in the objet trouvé at this time took many forms, for example in the use of reclaimed rubbish by Robert Rauschenberg for his ‘combine’ paintings, largely under the influence of Schwitters; in the reliance on expendable materials in Junk art, for example in the assemblages of Edward Kienholz and another artist working in Los Angeles, Wallace Berman (b 1926); in the absurd kinetic machines of Jean Tinguely; and in the ‘happenings’ of Allan Kaprow and Jim Dine. The example of Schwitters was acknowledged also by Louise Nevelson; her boxed assemblages, painted a single uniform colour, recall theMerzbau in their scale and in their accretion of heterogeneous objects submitted to an overall composition. In the 1970s objects featured prominently in the work of Joseph Beuys and of the artists associated with Arte Povera, notably Jannis Kounellis. While some artists working in the 1980s, such as Julian Schnabel or Mimmo Paladino, used objects to supplement painted forms, others such as Tony Cragg and Bill Woodrow, who were part of a coherent movement in British sculpture, once again employed the objet trouvé as raw material.

Term applied in the 20th century to existing objects, manufactured or of natural origin, used in, or as, works of art. With the exception of the Ready-made, in which a manufactured object is generally presented on its own without mediation, the objet trouvé is most often used as raw material in an Assemblage, with juxtaposition as a guiding principle. Prior to the 20th century unusual objects were collected in cabinets of curiosities, but it was only in the early 20th century that found objects came to be appreciated as works of art in their own right. Antoni Gaudí, for example, used broken pieces of pottery to cover exterior surfaces in the Park Güell buildings (1900–14) in Barcelona and on various buildings designed by him during the same period. The development of Collage in Cubism heralded a greater dependence on found objects, paralleling the incorporation of conversational fragments in the poetry of Guillaume Apollinaire from 1912; Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, in particular, used real items in their paintings and constructions as a way of commenting on the relationship between reality, representation and illusion. Their example in turn encouraged Vladimir Tatlin to use ordinary objects in his reliefs of 1913–14, and other sculptors, such as Alexander Archipenko and Umberto Boccioni, to extend the range of materials acceptable in sculpture.

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Marcel Duchamp

"fountain"

 

Fountain is a 1917 work widely attributed to Marcel Duchamp. The scandalous work was a porcelain urinal, which was signed "R.Mutt" and titledFountain. Submitted for the exhibition of the Society of Independent Artists in 1917, Fountain was rejected by the committee, even though the rules stated that all works would be accepted from artists who paid the fee. Fountain was displayed and photographed at Alfred Stieglitz's studio, and the photo published in The Blind Man, but the original has been lost.

 

The work is regarded by some art historians and theorists of the avant-garde, such as Peter Bürger, as a major landmark in 20th-century art. 17 replicas commissioned by Duchamp in the 1960s now exist.

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Man Ray

"gift"

 

Cadeau, 1921, editioned replica 1972, or ‘Gift’, is one of the famous icons of the surrealist movement. It consists of an everyday continental flat iron of the sort that had to be heated on a stove, transformed here into a non-functional, disturbing object by the addition of a single row of fourteen nails. The transformation of an item of ordinary domestic life into a strange, unnameable object with sadistic connotations exemplified the power of the object within dada and surrealism to escape the rule of logic and the conventional identification of words and objects. Man Ray once said, ‘There are objects that need names.

"Gift is a typical product of Man Ray’s double-edged humour. Its sadistic implications need not be stressed. Its erotic aspect is revealed by Man Ray’s remark: ‘You can tear a dress to ribbons with it. I did it once, and asked a beautiful eighteen-year-old coloured girl to wear as it as she danced. Her body showed through as she moved around, it was like a bronze in movement. It was really beautiful. 
Man Ray’s intentions, which might be seen as merely to deride the iron’s functions are much more subtle. Man Ray never destroys, he always modifies and enriches. In this case, he provides the flatiron with a new role, a role that we dimly guess, and the probably accounts for the object’s strange fascination." (Schwarz)

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- BUILDING BLOCKS

task 2

JAN TSCHICHOLD 

 

Tschichold claimed that he was one of the most powerful influences on 20th century typography. There are few who would attempt to deny that statement. The son of a sign painter and trained in calligraphy, Tschichold began working with typography at a very early age. Raised in Germany, he worked closely with Paul Renner (who designed Futura) and fled to Switzerland during the rise of the Nazi party. His emphasis on new typography and sans-serif typefaces was deemed a threat to the cultural heritage of Germany, which traditionally used Blackletter Typography and the Nazis seized much of his work before he was able to flee the country.

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JOSEPH MULLER BROCHMAN

 

As with most graphic designers that can be classified as part of the Swiss International Style, Joseph Müller-Brockmann was influenced by the ideas of several different design and art movements including Constructivism, De Stijl, Suprematism and the Bauhaus. He is perhaps the most well-known Swiss designer and his name is probably the most easily recognized when talking about the period. He was born and raised in Switzerland and by the age of 43 he became a teacher at the Zurich school of arts and crafts.

Perhaps his most decisive work was done for the Zurich Town Hall as poster advertisements for its theater productions. He published several books, includingThe Graphic Artist and His Problems and Grid Systems in Graphic Design. These books provide an in-depth analysis of his work practices and philosophies, and provide an excellent foundation for young graphic designers wishing to learn more about the profession. He spent most of his life working and teaching, even into the early 1990s when he toured the US and Canada speaking about his work. He died in Zurich in 1996.
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JOSEF ALBERS

 

Josef Albers (March 19, 1888 – March 25, 1976) was a German-born Americanartist and educator whose work, both in Europe and in the United States, formed the basis of some of the most influential and far-reaching art education programs of the twentieth century.

 

Architype Albers is a modular stencil sans-serif typeface based upon a series of experiments between 1926 and 1931. The Architype Albers typeface is one of a collection of several revivals of early twentieth century typographic experimentation designed by Freda Sack and David Quay of The Foundry.

 

Albers designed a series of stencil faces while teaching at the Dessau Bauhaus. The typeface is based on a limited palette of geometric forms combined in a size ratio of 1:3. Drawn on a grid, the elements of square, triangle, and circle combine to form letters with an economy of form. Never intended for text, the face was designed for use on posters and in large scale signs.

 

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CONSTRUCTIVISM

 

Constructivism was an artistic and architectural philosophy that originated in Russia beginning in 1919, a rejection of the idea of autonomous art. The movement was in favour of art as a practice for social purposes. Constructivism had a great effect on modern art movements of the 20th century, influencing major trends such as the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements. Its influence was pervasive, with major impacts upon architecture, graphic and industrial design, theatre, film, dance, fashion and to some extent music.

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ALEXANDER RODCHENKO 

 

Alexander Rodchenko is perhaps the most important avant-garde artist to have put his art in the service of political revolution. In this regard, his career is a model of the clash between modern art and radical politics. He emerged as a fairly conventional painter, but his encounters with Russian Futurists propelled him to become an influential founder of the Constructivist movement. And his commitment to the Russian Revolution subsequently encouraged him to abandon first painting and then fine art in its entirety, and to instead put his skills in the service of industry and the state, designing everything from advertisements to book covers. His life's work was a ceaseless experiment with an extraordinary array of media, from painting and sculpture to graphic design and photography. Later in his career, however, the increasingly repressive policies targeted against modern artists in Russia led him to return to painting.

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some pages from my sketchbook

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The Constructivists compared the artist to an engineer, arranging materials scientifically and objectively, and producing art works as rationally as any other manufactured object. This was, in theory, an art that transcended gender differences. The equality of the sexes was an important Communist principle, and this was one of the first periods in history when female artists were valued as highly as their male counterparts.

 

http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/rodchenko-popova/rodchenko-and-popova-defining-constructivism

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CONSTRUCTIVIST ARCHITECTURE 

 

Constructivist architecture was a form of modern architecture that flourished in the Soviet Union in the 1920s and early 1930s. It combined advanced technology and engineering with an avowedly Communist social purpose. Although it was divided into several competing factions, the movement produced many pioneering projects and finished buildings, before falling out of favour around 1932. Its effects have been marked on later developments in architecture.

After producing letters of my typeface out of cement I have noticed a connection with a geometrical and fragmental architecture of constructivist buildings, therefore decided to use constructivism as a starting point.

 

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ZINE

Paula Rego/Honoré Daumier: Scandal, Gossip and Other Stories

 

"Although more than a century separates these two artists, the works of Rego and Daumier reveal a wide range of common concerns and approaches which will be explored in this exhibition. Both are consummate storytellers who use printmaking (in the form of lithographs and etchings) to bring their visions, stories and politics to a wider audience.

Paula Rego, who trained at the Slade School of Art, has won a wide and admiring audience for her psychologically charged presentations of human dramas. Women are often placed at the centre of her work and characters also frequently take the form of animals for satirical effect.

Works by Honoré Daumier have been selected from the more than 4,000 lithographs made during his lifetime, principally for the publications Le Charivari and La Caricature. As a caricaturist Daumier was a wry observer of human comedy who exaggerated the aspirations, affectations and failings of society, producing work that was considered seditious enough to earn him a six month prison sentence."  

- taken from http://www.houseofillustration.org.uk/whats-on/whats-on/paula-regohonore-daumier-scandal-gossip-and-other-stories

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HONORÉ DAUMIER

 

Honoré Daumier (French: [ɔnɔʁe domje]; February 26, 1808 – February 10, 1879) was a French printmaker, caricaturist, painter, and sculptor, whose many works offer commentary on social and political life in France in the 19th century.

Daumier produced over 500 paintings, 4000 lithographs, 1000 wood engravings, 1000 drawings and 100 sculptures. A prolific draftsman, he was perhaps best known for his caricatures of political figures and satires on the behavior of his countrymen, although posthumously the value of his painting has also been recognized.

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PAULA REGO

 

Dame Paula Rego, DBE (born 26 January 1935), is a Portuguese visual artist who is particularly well known for her paintings and prints based on storybooks. Rego’s style has evolved from abstract towards representational, and she has favoured pastels over oils for much of her career. Her work often reflects feminism, coloured by folk-themes from her native Portugal. Rego studied at the Slade School of Fine Art and was an exhibiting member of the London Group with David Hockney and Frank Auerbach. She was the first artist-in-residence at the National Gallery in London. She lives and works in London.

 

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"Not all artists are good at explaining their work but Paula Rego knows just what her pictures are about: they deal, she says, with “the beautiful grotesque”. It is a neat encapsulation of psychologically complex works that illustrate nursery rhymes, fairy tales and the folk stories of her native Portugal, that show women as dogs or sexual avengers and that reimagine classic novels such as Jane Eyre and The Metamorphosis.

Rego’s pictures (predominantly in pastels; she abandoned painting in the mid-1990s) contain real people and an assortment of mannequins – strange creatures made from pillows, stuffed tights and old clothes – as well as plaster saints, plastic Virgins and toy animals dressed like dolls. This cast of artist’s extras lives in her studio and, along with a couple of favourite models, is pressed into service again and again to people her pictorial stories. The results are indeed beautiful but they are never less than strange and frequently deeply sinister."

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Beautiful grotesque: the “dark play” of Paula Rego

 

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- 40 HOURS

JOHN BALDESSARI

 

John Anthony Baldessari (born June 17, 1931) is an American conceptual artist known for his work featuring found photography and appropriated images. He lives and works in Santa Monica and Venice, California.

Initially a painter, Baldessari began to incorporate texts and photography into his canvases in the mid-1960s. In 1970 he began working in printmaking, film, video, installation, sculpture and photography. He has created thousands of works that demonstrate—and, in many cases, combine- the narrative potential of images and the associative power of language within the boundaries of the work of art. His art has been featured in more than 200 solo exhibitions in the U.S. and Europe. His work influenced Cindy Sherman, David Salle, and Barbara Kruger among others.

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"This show is cynical in the good sense. There is a good sense. Or anyway there was, and now is an excellent time to revive it. The Greek Cynic philosophers -- including Diogenes, who sought an honest man -- were vocational outsiders who called things by their names. They were radically ethical. They opposed truth to pleasure and espoused truth absolutely. They exasperated regular people on purpose. A few New Testament scholars guess that the historical Jesus was a Hebrew Cynic who got, besides killed, drastically misunderstood.

 

Our present sense of cynicism rests on the wisdom that extreme candor is toxic when self-serving. The old Cynics suffered from and for unwelcome truth. Their bastard heirs seek excuses for smug attitudes and rotten behavior. The small-c cynic knows, in Oscar Wilde's words, "the price of everything and the value of nothing." The big-C Cynic pointed to how price -- that is, every sort of advantage-seeking motive -- pollutes value. The veteran Los Angeles Conceptual artist and teacher John Baldessari has always had a subtle, refreshing touch of the Cynic.

 

This show samples a series of paintings, first exhibited at last year's Venice Biennale, that resume a motif of Baldessari's earliest mature work, from over 30 years ago: banal photography blown up on canvas with gnomic captions lettered by a professional sign painter. Here the photographs are black-and-whites of isolated common objects, imprinted by computerized ink jet. The mechanical images, set off by broad white borders, have a stippled, vertically striated texture like furry black rain. The captions are from or imitate those of Francisco de Goya etchings: terse phrases of flat, despairing sarcasm.

 

Here are some "Goya Series" captions and their respective photographic subjects: "This Is Bad," an empty bowl; "And There Is No Remedy," a beat-up scrub brush; "These Too," a pair of high-heeled shoes; "Right," a snarl of string; "Less Than Perfect," an overripe peach; "There Isn't Time," a floral arrangement; "And," a paper clip; "So Much and More," a pencil; and "It Couldn't Be Helped," a goofily smiling mouth floated Cheshire fashion. Also shown are perfunctory collage studies for the paintings, with photos and lettering affixed to graph paper."

 

wonderful cynicism:
john baldessari

by Peter Schjeldahl

 

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CHRISTIAN MARCLAY 

Christian Ernest Marclay (born 11 January 1955) is a Swiss and American visual artist and composer.

Marclay's work explores connections between sound, noise, photography, video, and film. A pioneer of using gramophone records and turntables as musical instruments to create sound collages, Marclay is, in the words of critic Thom Jurek, perhaps the "unwitting inventor of turntablism." His own use of turntables and records, beginning in the late 1970s, was developed independently of but roughly parallel to hip hop's use of the instrument.

 

 

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"Winner of the Golden Lion award at the 2011 Venice Biennale, Christian Marclay's The Clock is a cinematic tour de force that unfolds on the screen in real time through thousands of film excerpts that form a 24-hour montage. Appropriated from the last 100 years of cinema’s rich history, the film clips chronicle the hours and minutes of the 24-hour period, often by displaying a watch or clock. The Clock incorporates scenes of everything from car chases and board rooms to emergency wards, bank heists, trysts, and high-noon shootouts."

 

taken from: http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1333

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